News that Sha’Carri Richardson would not be able to compete in the Tokyo Olympics because she tested positive for marijuana has become a significant story even in the midst of a pandemic.

After Richardson won the 100-meter event in Oregon despite failing a drug test, she attracted a “legion of admirers.”

Only an Egghead Would Think Shacarri Richardson Should Be ...

Only an Egghead Would Think Shacarri Richardson Should Be

She was later stripped of her victory and barred from participating for a month. Although she was technically allowed to participate in the Olympic relay event under the rules of her ban, she was not included to the team when USA Track and Field released its roster.

As a result of this narrative, numerous other sportsmen, celebrities, and politicians have started to doubt the rule, and the criticism and backlash have been tremendous.

What Opinions Do Today’s Youth Have of Richardson’s Suspension?

Today, questions about Sha’Carri, the legalisation of marijuana for sports, and the Olympics were submitted using our on-demand survey platform. Their views on Sha’Carri Richardson’s suspension are clear-cut:

Richardson should not have been barred for testing positive for marijuana, according to 63% of respondents between the ages of 16 and 34, while only 25% of respondents share this opinion. Not just politicians and well-known people have opposed Richardson’s prohibition; the general populace has as well.

With supporters urging the school to “reinstate Richardson” and opponents citing a “outdated and arbitrarily enforced marijuana legislation,” a Let Sha’Carri Run! petition on MoveOn has almost reached its goal of 600,000 signatures.

Additionally, Generation Z and Millennial young adults see stress as a valid medical reason to consume cannabis: We found that the majority (55%) of cannabis consumers between the ages of 18 and 36 describe the drug’s stress-relieving properties as their main motivation for using it.

Since just 12% of young people have heard of Sha’Carri Richardson, we questioned them whether athletes should be prohibited from using marijuana.

Final Words

Only 28% of respondents between the ages of 16 and 34 felt that athletes should be prohibited for this reason, as opposed to 72% who disagreed.

The cannabis industry has recently been driven ahead by young customers, particularly Millennials, as evidenced by the “Cannabis Infusion” survey, which found that 48% of young people think marijuana should be legalised for both medicinal and recreational use.

These generations are likely to disagree with a ban on marijuana use by Olympic athletes because they generally embraced marijuana use before the general population. Thanks for reading our article Only an Egghead Would Think Shacarri Richardson Should Be …